Malaria

In total, 62 (50.8%) of the 122 eligible inpatient pharmacists participated in the educational module. Of these, 2 pharmacists did not complete the post-test and 3 were excluded from the pre-test analysis because they completed the post-test first. Therefore, test results for 57 (46.7%) of the 122 eligible pharmacists were available for full analysis. On average, pharmacists had 8 years of experience working within inpatient dispensaries, and 27% (17/62) had some prior experience in dealing with orders for antimalarial medication.

For 9 of the 10 questions about triage management of malaria, the percentage of pharmacists with the correct answer increased by 13 to 54 percentage points after implementation of the module (Table 1). For the question asking pharmacists to select the most appropriate candidate for oral antimalarial therapy from among 3 scenarios, the percentage of respondents with the correct response was low both before and after implementation of the module. When asked how quinine for IV administration is supplied in the Calgary Health Region, all of the pharmacists gave the correct answer in the post-test, an improvement over 81% in the pre-test. When asked what information was essential for the release of IV quinine, 95% of pharmacists who took the post-test correctly identified the patient’s full name, age, and weight, also an improvement over 49% in the pre-test.
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Table 1. Test Results Before and After Implementation of a Web-Based Educational Module about Antimalarial Therapy




Phase of Study; No.
(%) ofUsers


with Correct Answer


Question*

Before n

= 59)

After
(n

= 60)

Triage process for malaria infection

Screening to identify the most appropriate and most

urgent order for antimalarial medication

39

(66)

58

(97)

Scenario most appropriate for oral antimalarial therapy

8

(14)

8

(13)

Scenario most appropriate for IV antimalarial therapy

19

(32)

32

(53)

Symptoms and laboratory results indicative that IV route

is appropriate

18

(31)

51

(85)

Course of action for severe Plasmodium falciparum
malaria

26

(44)

34

(57)

Choice of false statement regarding treatment of severe

chloroquine-resistant
P. falciparum

27

(46)

40

(67)

Choice of true statement regarding severe P.
falciparum
malaria

34

(58)

44

(73)

Monitoring of IV quinine therapy in the Calgary Health Region

40

(68)

55

(92)

Monitoring and follow-up once IV quinine has been initiated

44

(75)

53

(88)

Antibiotic or antimalarial agent that is to be used with

caution in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

deficiency

48

(81)

59

(98)


Procedures for IV administration of quinine

Location of supply of IV quinine in the Calgary Health Region

48

(81)

60

(100)

Information essential for the release of IV quinine

29

(49)

57

(95)

*Test questions were in multiple-choice format.

The average of all pharmacists’ pre-test scores was greater than 50%. Pharmacists’ pre-test scores were unaffected by their experience with malaria (or lack thereof). Overall, the mean score increased from 53.6% on the pre-test to 76.4% on the post-test. The mean increase in score for inpatient pharmacists who completed the module was 22.6 percentage points (95% CI 18.3-27.0, 159 = 10.3, p < 0.001). Cialis Jelly

Table 2. Comfort Level of Inpatient Pharmacists in Processing Malaria Orders

Phase of

Study; No. (%) ofUsers


Comfort Level


Before (n


= 59)


After
(n


= 60)

Very uncomfortable

12

(20)

0

Uncomfortable

37

(63)

18

(30)

Comfortable

10

(17)

41

(68)

Very comfortable

0

1

(2)

After completion of the module, there were also increases in pharmacists’ level of comfort in processing malaria orders (Table 2). Of the 49 pharmacists who reported feeling very uncomfortable or uncomfortable on the pre-test,  had increases in their stated comfort level to at least comfortable after completing the module. The percentage of pharmacists who felt comfortable or very comfortable with processing malaria orders increased from 17% to 70% after completion of the module. No individual pharmacist reported feeling less comfortable processing malaria orders after completion of the module.
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Table 3. User Satisfaction with Web-based Education Module


Response; No. (%) of Users (n= 60)


Satisfaction Component


Strongly


Disagree


Neutral


Agree


Strongly

Disagree

Agree

Materials achieved learning objectives

0

1 (2)

1 (2)

40 (67)

18 (30)

eb-based format was effective

0

0

1 (2)

28 (47)

31 (52)

Explanations were clear and
understandable

0

0

3 (5)

40 (67)

17 (28)

Organization of materials was
effective

0

0

5 (8)

40 (67)

15 (25)

It took too long to complete materials

8 (13)

37 (62)

13 (22)

1 (2)

1 (2)

It was difficult to locate educational
materials

32 (53)

25 (42)

0

3 (5)

0

More than 90% of participating pharmacists agreed that the materials provided had achieved the stated learning objectives, that the Web-based format was effective, that clear and understandable explanations had been provided, and that the organization of the materials was effective (Table 3). Conversely, most pharmacists disagreed that the module took too long to complete or that the educational materials were difficult to locate. No participants gave consistently negative evaluations on the six user satisfaction criteria. In addition, many pharmacists sent positive comments and feedback by e-mail. cheap female viagra

Category: Diseases / Tags: Evaluation, Malaria

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