NEAR-ELDERLY UNINSURED: Conclusion 3

For example, Medicare offers a more stable source of health insurance which may itself have a health advantage because the decision to leave work when one is recovering from an illness may improve recovery (Bradley et al., 2005). This might outweigh the possibility that insurance coverage under Medicare may be less generous, on average, when…

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NEAR-ELDERLY UNINSURED: Conclusion 2

Our evidence of Medicare improving the health status for the uninsured is consistent with evidence that the lack of health insurance in the period immediately preceding Medicare eligibility is associated with faster declines in health (Baker et al., 2001; Dor, Sudano, and Baker, 2006) and suggests that Medicare may attenuate the rapid health declines of…

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NEAR-ELDERLY UNINSURED: Conclusion

Table 7 presents the sensitivity of the results to various alternatives. The results are insensitive to changes in retirement status, changes in marital status, or the introduction of Social Security payments suggesting that the difference within the insured and uninsured groups cannot be attributed to these often contemporaneous changes at age 65. The results are…

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NEAR-ELDERLY UNINSURED: Results 2

As a check on the fit of our model and our simulation to the raw data on health status for our sample, we graphically display the raw trajectories with the trajectories from our fitted data in Figure 5. This dramatically demonstrates the remarkable fit of our model. Table 5 displays the simulated incremental effects between…

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NEAR-ELDERLY UNINSURED: Results

Table 3 shows the baseline characteristics of the study sample by insurance status. The insured and uninsured groups in the HRS at age 59/60 are representative of these groups in the United States. The uninsured are more likely to be in fair or poor health, are less likely to work, have lower education and lower…

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NEAR-ELDERLY UNINSURED: Empirical Model 2

The simulation is similar to a Markov chain, but instead of using average transition probabilities and averages for initial conditions, the Markov process is conducted at the individual level. This allows for unique transition probabilities for each individual’s covariates. This greatly simplifies the process when the time dependent covariates of retirement status and Social Security…

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NEAR-ELDERLY UNINSURED: Empirical Model

We estimate health state transitions between health state at age t (Ht) and the health state at age t+2 (Ht+2), one survey wave later. Ht+2 is a categorical variable with four categories: j = (excellent/very good (E), good (G), fair/poor (F), and died (D)). The transitions from Ht to Ht+2 are estimated by using the…

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